System settings

The OXYGEN System Settings can be accessed via enlarging the System Settings menu to the full screen.

Note

A single click on any menu button will show a small view of the menu that contains the most important functionalities and information. Keeping the left mouse button on the menu button pressed and moving the mouse to the opposite side of the screen will expand the menu to the full screen and show all options.

System Settings – Overview

Fig. 76 System settings - overview

The content of the individual submenus will be explained in the following sections in detail.

Measurement setup

Measurement setup - overview

Fig. 77 Measurement setup - overview

General settings

  • Data storing: The folder to which data shall be stored, a prefix for data-filename and a folder to which data shall be exported can be specified here.

  • Set file name: The user can choose between different placeholders and text to individually set a name for the datafile. The 3 different placeholders are the following: - Time - Date - Number

Time

  • Time, Local: the local time is used.

  • Time, UTC: the UTC time is used.

  • Time, hh-mm-ss: the time can be used in different formats.

  • Hours [h], minutes [m], seconds [s] and milliseconds [z] can be arranged individually. The milliseconds are always in a 3-digit format. As separator [- . _] can be used, e.g. ss-mm-hh”, “mm_hh”, “ssmmhh”.

Note

The text File Start can be added, in order to guarantee the individual recording start for multi-file recordings. Example: #{Time, File Start, “hh-mm-ss”}.

Date

  • Date, Local: the local date is used.

  • Date, UTC: the UTC date is used.

  • Date, dd-MM-yy: the date can be used in different formats. Day, month and year can be arranged individually. As separator “-“ or none must be used, e.g. “yy-MM-dd”, “dd-MM”, “ddMMyy”.

Note

The placeholder letter for month (M) is written in capitals, to distinguish it from the placeholder for minutes (m).

Number

  • Counter, Local: this counter is persistent, meaning it will continue to increase also after OXYGEN or the whole system will be restarted. This counter can be reset by entering a desired number (e.g. 0) in the field for the Local Session Counter, see Fig. 78.

  • Counter, Session: this counter is dependent on the OXYGEN session and will increase every time a new measurement is started. It will be reset if OXYGEN is closed and started again.

  • Counter, Custom: this counter is a custom counter and must be adjusted manually to increase.

It is also possible to enter individual text in the text field. With these options it is possible to configure an individual name for standard or advanced use.

The filename preview shows the result of the configured file name.

Multi-file recording

For multi-file recording the folder name is set by the file name pattern for the first file. If no separate folder should be created deactivate the slider in the multi-file settings names create subfolder. A separate multi-file counter (00x) is used if the individual file names are identical. With the optional text File Start in the Time placeholder, the timestamp of the recording start of each multi-file recording can be used.

Examples

#{Date, Local}_#{Number, Session}

The session counter is 3. Therefore, the multi-file recordings will have the following names: 20210503_003_001, 20210503_003_002, 20210503_003_003 etc.

#{Time, File Start, “hh-mm-ss”}

The multi-file recordings will have the following names: 09-55-29, 09-55-39, 09-55-49 etc.

Note

The single placeholders for minutes, seconds, year… are always written in a 2-digit format. Therefore, the expression “hhhh” would end up being “1010” for 10 o’clock. In case one digit is missing (“hhh”), it will nonetheless be “1010” since the third “h” it will be interpreted as a second full placeholder for “hour”. It is not possible to increase the resolution with more digits.

Selection of different file names with placeholders

Fig. 78 Selection of different file names with placeholders

To specify a file name before recording start enable the button Ask for file name before recording start.

Ask for file name before recording start button

Fig. 79 Ask for file name before recording start button

If this button is enabled, a pop-up window (see Fig. 80) will appear where the file name can be entered.

Note

The recording only starts by clicking on the Record button (marked red in Fig. 80) in the pop-up window after entering the file name.

Pop-up window to enter the file name before recording start

Fig. 80 Pop-up window to enter the file name before recording start

Measurement setup

A measurement setup file can be loaded or stored here. To reset the measurement settings to the startup defaults, use the Reset to defaults button.

Startup behavior

The user can select if the default setup file (see Fig. 10), an empty setup file, the last setup file or a user defined setup file shall be opened when OXYGEN is started.

Multi-file menu

Fig. 81 Multi-file menu

Multi-file recordings are stored in a separate folder per default, which has the same name as the first multi-file. To deactive the creation of a subfolder for multi-files, deactivate the slider in the multi-file settings (see Fig. 81).

Recording a multi-file

Especially during long measurement campaigns, it might be useful if data is not stored to one single file but to several individual files. Among others, this mechanism allows the user to analyze and post-process data from the beginning of the measurement while the measurement itself is still running. This mechanism is called multi-file recording. If multi-file recording is enabled, OXYGEN supports three different ways to split files:

  • Split by duration

  • Split by number of recording events

  • Split by absolute time.

Split by duration

If split by duration is selected, OXYGEN stores data automatically to a new file if the defined time interval is exceeded: A new data file will be created after 10 s, 2 0s, 30 s etc, overall recording time. The minimum time interval is 10 seconds.

Special case

Split by Duration in combination with enabled event based waveform recording and disabled User Reduced Statistics recording (see Triggered Events). With this combination, it can happen that no data is stored to a multi-file part. The following cases might appear:

  • No data recording after arming the Trigger: If it takes a certain time after arming Trigger and the first occurring recording event, the time between arming the Trigger and the first occurring recording event will be rejected and the ‘0s’ position will be shifted to the Arm Trigger position to the first occurring recording event. Thus, the first data file begins not at the position the Trigger is armed but at the position the first recording event occurs. The following Fig. 82 will illustrate this case:

Special case 1 for multi-file recording; split duration: 10s

Fig. 82 Special case 1 for multi-file recording; split duration: 10s

  • No data recording between two recording events: If the time between two occurring recording events is longer than the specified Split time interval, an empty data file created. (see File 3 in Fig. 82)

  • No data between the last occurring recording event and disarming the Trigger: If it takes a certain time between the last occurring recording event and disarming the Trigger, the time within will be rejected and no new data file will be created. The following Fig. 83 will illustrate that case. This is also the reason why the Split Stop/Start Marker is only created retroactively if a new recording event occurs and not at the exact time the split duration is exceeded.

Special case 2 for multi-file recording; split duration: 10s

Fig. 83 Special case 2 for multi-file recording; split duration: 10s

Note

If User Reduced Statistics recording is enabled for the upper explained special case, this special case will not be applied, because (statistics) data will be recorded continuously.

Split by number of recording events

If split by number of recording events (see ③ in Fig. 81) is selected, OXYGEN creates a new data file if the defined number of recording events is reached. I.e. in the example of Fig. 81, a new data file will be created after the 2nd, 4th, 6th, … recording event is terminated.

Special Case

If Split by number of recording events is used in combination with a pre-recording time which lasts back to the recording event that occurred before, both recording events will be regarded as one entire recording event, because they are connected by the pre-recording time. The following will illustrate this case for a recording split after two events:

Special Case 3 for multi-file recording; Split after 2 recording events

Fig. 84 Special Case 3 for multi-file recording; Split after 2 recording events

Note

The DejaView™ functionality (see DejaView™) is applicable during multi-file recording as well. The instant of time a new data file is created is visible in the event List (see Event List) as Split Start and Split Stop marker (see Fig. 85).

Split Start and Split Stop Marker

Fig. 85 Split Start and Split Stop Marker

Split by absolute time

If split by absolute time (see ④ in Fig. 81) is selected, OXYGEN stores data automatically to a new file after every defined time interval. The OXYGEN Acquisition Time is used as the reference time. The first split can be selected using the popup calendar.

Pop-up to select the first split

Fig. 86 Pop-up to select the first split

The files can be split after minutes, hours or days. The minimum interval for a split is one minute. After selecting the interval, a small preview of the next splits is shown in the settings in the multi-file section, also shown in Fig. 87. In that way the user can check if the settings are right.

Split options and split preview for split by absolute time

Fig. 87 Split options and split preview for split by absolute time

Special case

Split by absolute time in combination with enabled event based waveform recording and disabled User Reduced Statistics recording (see Triggered Events).

  • With this combination, it can happen that no data is stored to a multi-file part. The following cases might appear:

  • No data recording after arming the Trigger

  • If it takes a certain time after arming Trigger and the first occurring recording event, the first file split will also occur with the first occurring recording event.

  • Thus, the first data file begins not at the position the Trigger is armed but at the position the first recording event occurs. The first file can, therefore, be shorter than the defined interval. The next splits are done correctly according to the defined interval as shown in the split preview. This case is shown in Fig. 88.

  • No data recording between two recording events

  • If the time between two occurring recording events is longer than the specified Split interval, an empty data file will be created. (see File 4 in Fig. 88)

    Special case 1 for multi-file recording; Split by absolute time; interval: 1 min

    Fig. 88 Special case 1 for multi-file recording; Split by absolute time; interval: 1 min

  • No data between the last occurring recording event and disarming the Trigger

  • If no recording event happens after disarming the Trigger, the files will be split and created, nonetheless, according to the defined interval until the stop button is pressed. This case is shown in Fig. 89.

Special case 2 for multi-file recording; Split by absolute time; interval: 1 min

Fig. 89 Special case 2 for multi-file recording; Split by absolute time; interval: 1 min

Note

If User Reduced Statistics recording is enabled for the upper explained special case, this special case will not be applied, because (statistics) data will be recorded continuously.

Splits are only possible on rounded times, therefore only integer numbers can be used, e.g. 1, 2, …, 5 etc. min/h/d. It is not possible to split files every 1.5 hours.

If the first split lies in the past the next splits will be calculated correctly using the actual time.

Loading a multi-file

Multi-file parts that belong to the same measurement are stored in the folder of the selected data storing folder (see General settings) or in a separate folder of the selected folder, if the option create subfolder is active. The individual multi-files are enumerated starting with 1.

To load multi-files, click on the Open Data File button (see Fig. 90) and select the desired multi-file data folder. The folder is named to the same manner as data files are named. Thus, a prefix can be freely defined, and the actual date and time is appended automatically to the folder name (see Measurement setup).

Open data file button

Fig. 90 Open data file button

After selecting the correct folder, the single multi-files are shown in a list. The Info tab shows if the selected file(s) is (are) a part(s) of a multi-file-recording and the number of compatible parts selected (see Fig. 91). It is possible to open all parts (see Fig. 92), several parts (see Fig. 93) or only one single part (see Fig. 94) of a multi-file recording. The file selection can be done with the check boxes which are placed left to the file name. If several or all parts are opened, they are displayed in the correct chronological order.

Opening a multi-file

Fig. 91 Opening a multi-file

Opening all parts of a multi-file recording

Fig. 92 Opening all parts of a multi-file recording

Opening several parts of a multi-file recording

Fig. 93 Opening several parts of a multi-file recording

Opening one part of a multi-file recording

Fig. 94 Opening one part of a multi-file recording

If several parts are selected that are not part of a multi-file recording or don’t belong to the same multi-file recording, an information will be displayed in the Info tab and the Open button will be disabled (see Fig. 95).

Selection of non-compatible multi-file parts

Fig. 95 Selection of non-compatible multi-file parts

If several multi-file parts are opened simultaneously and data shall be exported, data is exported to one file. If data of multi-file parts shall be exported to separate files, the multi-file parts must be opened and exported successively.

Header data

System Settings Header Data – Overview

Fig. 96 System Settings Header Data – Overview

The user can define Header Data here by clicking on the + in the upper right corner or remove it again by clicking on the – behind the respective header information. Two types of header can be defined: Text header and Formula constant header.

Text header

When Header Data is added, a name must be assigned to the certain header information and a description can be added. It can also be selected if the header information shall be prompted at the recording start or at recording stop (see Fig. 97). If this option is selected, the description of each Header Information can be changed there by the certain operator. If Mandatory is selected, the operator must fill in information in the respective Header Description at the recording start or stop. Otherwise the UI cannot be closed.

Header Data UI at the recording start or stop

Fig. 97 Header Data UI at the recording start or stop

Formula constant header

In addition, the user can define numerical header which can be further used in a formula for mathematical operations. After defining the header name and value, the header can be found in the math formulas for further processing (see Fig. 98). For details about formulas, refer to Formula channel. The prompt option is not available for numerical headers.

Processing numerical headers in formulas

Fig. 98 Processing numerical headers in formulas

When a data or setup file is loaded, the user can also look at the Header Data here to facilitate the search for the correct data file (see Fig. 98).

Header Data information when loading a data file

Fig. 99 Header Data information when loading a data file

It is possible to add the Headers in a Text Box (refer to Text instrument) on the measurement screen. Three different procedures exist for adding Headers in a Text Box:

  • Select the desired Header information at the Header Name in the small view menu of the System Settings and add it by Drag and Drop to the Measurement Screen (see Fig. 101).

Adding Header Data via drag and drop from the System Settings to the measurement screen

Fig. 100 Adding Header Data via drag and drop from the System Settings to the measurement screen

  • Adding Header Data via drag and drop from the System Settings to the measurement screenHeader information can also be added to an existing Text Box by dragging and dropping it into it.

  • Create a Text Box and go to its Instrument Properties. Created Header Data is there visible, too and can be added to the Text Box via a double click on the individual Header Data or via drag and drop

Adding Header Data via drag and drop from the Text Box Instrument Properties to the measurement screen

Fig. 101 Adding Header Data via drag and drop from the Text Box Instrument Properties to the measurement screen

  • Create a Text Box and type in the Header Data Name according to the following syntax: ${Header Data Name} and the Header Data Description will show up in the Text Box (see Fig. 102).

Adding the Header Description in a Text Box

Fig. 102 Adding the Header Description in a Text Box

Advanced setup

System Settings *Advanced Setup* – Overview

Fig. 103 System Settings Advanced Setup – Overview

  • Instruments: In the Instruments section, DejaViewTM can be enabled/disabled. By default, DejaViewTM is always enabled. For a detailed description of DejaViewTM refer to DejaView™.

  • DAQP Modules: If DAQP/HSI modules are connected via ORION or a TRION-1802-dLV module, it must be defined if the output signal of the module is conditioned to ±5 V or ±10 V. The Output Range can be defined here.

  • System Time Synchronization: If an IRIG or GPS signal is received via a TRION-BASE (IRIG only), TRION-TIMING or TRION-VGPS module and if this signal is used for synchronization, the system time of the PC OXYGEN is running on can be set to this timing signal. For synchronization with an external timing source, refer to Applying an external synchronization signal to the DEWE2/3 system. The synchronization interval can be selected below and the minimum time interval is 10 seconds.

Note

OXYGEN must be started with Administrator rights to use this function as this functionality changes the system settings of the PC. If OXYGEN is started without Administrator rights but this functionality is activated, the error message System time synchronization not allowed (see Fig. 104) will be displayed in the lower right corner of the software. note that this setting is not stored to a dms-setup file but only to the registry.

Error message *System time synchronization not allowed*

Fig. 104 Error message System time synchronization not allowed

Sync setup

The following section provides information about the various synchronization options using OXYGEN with TRION hardware. With DEWE2/3 instruments there is nearly no limit when synchronizing systems with each other. The synchronization of the devices is either done via an Internal 10 MHz clock, TRION-SYNC-BUS (SYNC I/O, SYNC OUT), IRIG, PPS, PTP/IEE1588 or GPS. The synchronization options are depending on model and configuration of the DEWE2/3 instruments.

  • The synchronization input represents the input configuration of a device on how this instrument “gets” the input signal from any source or “generates” an input signal.

  • The synchronization output represents the output configuration of a device, which defines what kind of signal this instruments routes to the corresponding output, in order to synchronize with the next connected device.

Internal Timing Source

Each DEWE2/3 chassis has an internal 10 MHz clock which is used as the clock source in this particular DEWE2/3 system. This internal clock is used per default for synchronization. Therefore, the Auto Setup box is checked per default and Internal selected as Synchronization Input Source (see Fig. 105).

Sync setup - internal sync clock selected

Fig. 105 Sync setup - internal sync clock selected

The Sync indicator in the upper right corner of the menu will be grey if the Internal clock is used for synchronization.

TRION-SYNC-BUS

In addition, each DEWE2/3 system can output the synchronization signal of the 10 MHz of clock and forward it to another DEWE2/3 system. That is what the SYNC I/O connectors on the system are for (see Fig. 106).

SYNC I/O connectors of a DEWE2/3 system

Fig. 106 SYNC I/O connectors of a DEWE2/3 system

The forwarding of the synchronization signal can only be used in combination with the OXYGEN-NET option.

One socket being a synchronization OUT, whilst the other one could either be used as synchronization IN or OUT. The synchronization signal forwarding is activated per default (TRION (SYNC OUT) is activated in the Synchronization Output menu; see Fig. 105) and cannot be deactivated.

To clock another DEWE2/3 system with this forwarded synchronization signal, the following Sync Settings must be applied to the DEWE2/3 system that shall receive the synchronization signal: Uncheck the Auto Setup box and set the Synchronization Input source to TRION (SYNC I/O) (see Fig. 107).

Sync setup – TRION-SYNC-BUS selected

Fig. 107 Sync setup – TRION-SYNC-BUS selected

The Sync indicator in the upper right corner of the menu will be

  • Red, if no valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector

  • Orange, if a valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector but the system is not locked yet (this might take some seconds and will be locked automatically)

  • Green, if a valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector and the system is locked.

The Sync indicator is available in the Action bar as well if the Sync Setup is closed (see ② in Fig. 10).

The LED indication of the SYNC OUT and SYNC I/O connector have the following meaning:

Table 3 LED indication of the SYNC OUT and SYNC I/O connector

SYNC OUT

SYNC OUT

RED (stable)

Clock detected

Clock detected / Receiving clock

GREEN (stable)

Acquisition running

Acquisition running

Depending on the usage of the SYNC I/O (input or output) the LED indicates if the system clock is available or received correctly from another system. The green LED indicates that the acquisition is running. If the acquisition stops, the LED will be off.

Depending on the TRION board which is mounted to the first (Star) slot of the system, different synchronization signals can be applied to the system.

Applying an external synchronization signal to the DEWE2/3 system

Depending on the TRION board which is mounted to the first (Star) slot of the system, different external synchronization signals can be applied to the system.

The following Table 4 provides an overview about the supported external synchronization sources and proper TRION modules:

Table 4 Compatibility of TRION modules and synchronization source

IRIG A DC

IRIG B DC

IRIG A/B

GPS

PTP / IEE1558

PPS (rising edge)

PPS (falling edge)

TRION-BASE

x

x

x

x

x

TRION-TIMING

x

x

TRION-TIMING-V3

TRION-VGPS-20/-100

x

x

TRION-VGPS-20/-100-V3

Synchronization with a TRION-BASE board

If a TRION-BASE board is mounted to the first system slot (Star slot), the system can be synchronized with an external IRIG-B-DC or a PPS signal (synchronization to the Rising signal edge).

To use either IRIG-B-DC or the PPS signal as synchronization signal, connect the signal to the IRIG input of the TRION-BASE board (PPS signal must be input as well via the IRIG connector). Uncheck the Auto setup box in the Sync Setup and select either IRIG or PPS in the Synchronization Input menu (see Fig. 108).

Selecting an external synchronization source using a TRION-BASE board

Fig. 108 Selecting an external synchronization source using a TRION-BASE board

The Sync indicator in the upper right corner of the menu will be

  • Red, if no valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector

  • Orange, if a valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector but the system is not locked yet (this might take some seconds and will be locked automatically)

  • Green, if a valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector and the system is locked.

The Sync indicator is available in the Action bar as well if the Sync Setup is closed (see ② in Fig. 10).

Note

If an external synchronization signal is applied to the system, the signal can be forwarded via the TRION-SYNC-BUS (see TRION-SYNC-BUS) as well to synchronize other DEWE2/3 chassis.

In addition, the TRION-BASE board has an AUX connector which can output a rectangular (LVTTL) signal to synchronize other devices, i.e. a GigE camera, to the TRION hardware clock. To do so, enable the Frequency (AUX) switch in the Synchronization Output setup (see Fig. 109). The Frequency can be set from 10 Hz to 10 MHz and the Start Edge can be the Rising or Falling signal edge.

Providing a LVTTL signal via the AUX connector of the TRION-BASE board

Fig. 109 Providing a LVTTL signal via the AUX connector of the TRION-BASE board

Synchronization with a TRION-TIMING/VGPS board

If a TRION-TIMING or TRION-VGPS board is mounted to the first system slot (Star slot), the system can be synchronized with an external IRIG (A-DC, A-AC, B-DC, B-AC) or a PPS signal (synchronization to the Rising signal edge; synchronization to the Falling signal edge only if it is a TRION-TIMING/VGPS-V3 board).

IRIG

To use an IRIG signal as synchronization signal, connect the signal to the IRIG input of the TRION board. Uncheck the Auto setup box in the Sync Setup and select IRIG in the Synchronization Input menu (see Fig. 111). Go to the IrigCode drop-down menu and select the correct IRIG Code (see Fig. 110).

Sync settings for an IRIG synchronization

Fig. 110 Sync settings for an IRIG synchronization

PPS

To use a PPS signal as synchronization signal, connect the signal to the IRIG input of the TRION board (PPS signal must be input as well via the IRIG connector). Uncheck the Auto setup box in the Sync Setup and select PPS in the Synchronization Input menu (see Fig. 111). If the system shall be synchronized to the Rising signal edge, go to the InvertedInput drop-down menu and select False. If the system shall be synchronized to the Falling signal edge, go to the InvertedInput drop-down menu and select True.

Note

Only TRION-TIMING/VGPS-V3 boards support PPS synchronization to the falling signal edge.

Sync settings for a PPS synchronization

Fig. 111 Sync settings for a PPS synchronization

GPS

To use a GPS signal as synchronization signal, connect the signal to the GPS input of the TRIONTM board. Uncheck the Auto setup box in the Sync Setup and select GPS in the Synchronization Input menu (see Fig. 107).

Sync settings for a GPS synchronization

Fig. 112 Sync settings for a GPS synchronization

PTP/IEEE 1588

Note

Only TRION-TIMING/VGPS-V3 boards support PTP synchronization.

To use a PTP signal as synchronization signal, connect the signal to the PTP input of the TRION board. Uncheck the Auto setup box in the Sync Setup and select PTP in the Synchronization Input menu (see Fig. 113).

Sync Settings for a PTP synchronization

Fig. 113 Sync settings for a PTP synchronization

The Sync indicator in the upper right corner of the menu will be:

  • Red, if no valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector

  • Orange, if a valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector but the system is not locked yet (this might take some seconds and will be locked automatically)

  • Green, if a valid synchronization signal is connected to the SYNC I/O connector and the system is locked.

The Sync indicator is available in the Action bar as well if the Sync Setup is closed (see ② in Fig. 10).

Note

If an external synchronization signal is applied to the system, the signal can be forwarded via the TRION-SYNC-BUS (see TRION-SYNC-BUS) as well to synchronize other DEWE2/3 chassis.

In addition, the TRION-TIMING/VGPS boards have an AUX connector which can output a rectangular (LVTTL) signal to synchronize other devices, i.e. a GigE camera, to the TRION hardware clock. To do so, enable the Frequency (AUX) switch in the Synchronization Output setup (see Fig. 109). The Frequency can be set from 10 Hz to 10 MHz and the Start Edge can be the Rising or Falling signal edge.

Providing a LVTTL signal via the AUX connector of the TRION-TIMING/VGPS board

Fig. 114 Providing a LVTTL signal via the AUX connector of the TRION-TIMING/VGPS board

General Remarks on PPS and IRIG synchronization

  • PPS is the abbreviation for Pulse Per Second. PPS signals provide one pulse per second whose Rising or Falling Edge is used for data synchronization.

  • PPS signals are usually provided by GPS receivers or IMUs, i.e. GeneSys ADMA’s or OxTS RT’s

  • PPS signals may look like the following:

    image1image2

  • The IRIG timecode is used to control a PLL, which is then used as the system time base.

  • The IRIG connector also has an indication LED flashing either green or red

IRIG connector; detailed view

Fig. 115 IRIG connector; detailed view

The IRIG LED has the following indication:

Table 5 IRIG-LED indication

OFF

ON

Description

GREEN (flashing)

20 %

80 %

SYNC IN not available

RED (flashing)

80 %

20 %

SYNC detected, not locked

Green (flashing)

80 %

20 %

SYNC detected and locked

DAQ hardware

System Settings *DAQ Hardware* – Overview

Fig. 116 System Settings DAQ Hardware – Overview

In the DAQ Hardware setup, the user can enable and disable the usability of different hardware series. For the detailed installing procedure of measurement hardware, refer to Hardware setup.

Sensor database

Note

This is an optional feature and requires a license.

OXYGEN offers the possibility of a sensor database to hold all relevant information about the user’s sensors.

system Settings *Sensors* – Overview

Fig. 117 System settings Sensors – Overview

The sensor database can be found in the System Settings and provides a comfortable user interface with familiar sub-menus.

To add a new sensor, click on the Add sensor button in the lower left corner (marked red in Fig. 117). The properties of the sensor are the same which are also available in the channel settings (for detailed explanation see Changing the channel settings). By clicking on the properties, a small pop-up window will appear as seen in Fig. 118 where the following parameters can be edited:

  • Name: name of the sensor

  • Serial No.: add the serial number of the sensor

  • Scaling: add channel scaling or sensitivity; also 2-point and table scaling is available

  • Measurement Input Properties (required by the sensor)

    • Input mode: define the input mode which is required by the sensor; choose between Voltage, Current, Bridge, Resistance, Potentiometer, Temperature and IEPE

    • Input Type: define the input type (depending on the input mode the input type varies)

    • Input range: define the input range (depending on the input mode the input range varies)

    • Excitation: choose excitation (off, Voltage, Current) and corresponding value

    • LP Filter: add optional lowpass filter, define the frequency, order (2, 4, 6, 8) and type (Bessel or Butterworth)

    • Coupling: choose coupling mode

    • And Bride-Input Specific Settings

    Sensor database – pop-up window to change channel scaling

    Fig. 118 Sensor database – pop-up window to change channel scaling

To duplicate or remove a sensor simply click on the respective sensor and on the Duplicate or Remove button as marked red in Fig. 117.

By clicking on + Advanced (see Fig. 119) in the parameter bar the advanced menu will open, and more properties can be added:

  • Bridge resistance

  • Bridge Sensor Offset

  • Bridge Shunt Target

  • Shunt Resistance

  • RTD Sensor Type

    Sensor database – open advanced menu

    Fig. 119 Sensor database – open advanced menu

To apply a sensor to a channel, proceed with the following steps:

  • Enter the channel settings by clicking on the little gear of the individual channel in the channel list (pushbutton ⑪ in Fig. 134 or Table 7, for details see Changing the channel settings in the channel setup).

  • Click on the Choose sensor button in the upper right corner, seen in Fig. 120.

    Applying a sensor to a channel in the channel settings

    Fig. 120 Applying a sensor to a channel in the channel settings

  • A pop-up window will appear with a list of all defined sensors seen in Fig. 121.

  • Choose the desired sensor and click OK. The search field might ease the search for a specific sensor in the list.

    Pop-up window to apply a sensor for a channel in the channel settings

    Fig. 121 Pop-up window to apply a sensor for a channel in the channel settings

  • The parameters of the sensor will be applied on the channel. This can be recognized by the name of the sensor, which will be displayed in the channel settings and in the channel, list seen in Fig. 122.

  • To remove an applied sensor from a channel simply click on the X button next to the sensor name in the channel settings (see Fig. 122).

    Name of chosen sensor for the channel seen in the channel list and channel settings

    Fig. 122 Name of chosen sensor for the channel seen in the channel list and channel settings

Note

  • Only analog sensors are supported in the database (no encoder).

  • Whenever the database is changed, the sensors on the assigned channels do not update automatically and must be assigned again.

  • An .xml file will be created with the sensor information, which can also be edited externally in a third-party software.

    The name of the xml-file is sensor_db.xml and can be found in the following directory: %PUBLIC%DocumentsDewetronOXYGEN.

Remote control

SCPI over Ethernet

Remote Control – SCPI over Ethernet menu

Fig. 123 Remote Control – SCPI over Ethernet menu

OXYGEN can be controlled by remote via SCPI. To do so, the Enable remote control button (see Fig. 123) must be switched on and SCPI over Ethernet must be enabled.

For detailed instructions and programming examples, refer to the manual OXYGEN Remote Control-SCPI Version Vx.x which is available on the DEWETRON CCC portal (https://ccc.dewetron.com/).

For additional information about typical performance and other basic points, refer to Table 6.

XCP over Ethernet

Note

This is an optional feature and requires a license.

OXYGEN can be controlled via XCP over Ethernet. To do so, the Enable remote control button (see Fig. 123) must be switched on and XCP over Ethernet (see Fig. 124) must be enabled.

Remote Control – XCP over Ethernet menu

Fig. 124 Remote Control – XCP over Ethernet menu

Within OXYGEN, the following XCP settings can be edited:

Configuration for XCP over Ethernet

Configuration for XCP over Ethernet

  • Communication Type: TCP server or UDP server

  • IP address of the OXYGEN device

  • Port Number

  • Output format: Double (64bit) or Float (32bit)

  • A2L File Path: The path the a2l-file is stored to. An a2l-file is automatically generated when XCP remote control is enabled and when OXYGEN is started

  • XML File Path: The path the xml-file is stored to. A xml-file is automatically generated when XCP remote control is enabled and when OXYGEN is started

Note

Be aware that the directory C:/Temp the a2l-file and the xml-file is stored to is not created automatically. Create the directory C:/Temp manually or change the path to an existing directory.

A user instruction to setup a remote control via CANape can be found in the document DEWETRON_OXYGEN_XCP_User_Instructions_Vx.x which is available on the DEWETRON CCC portal (https://ccc.dewetron.com/).

For additional information about typical performance and other basic points, refer to Table 6.

Usage SCPI and XCP simultaneously

It is possible to use the SCPI and the XCP plugin both simultaneously. Just enable both plugins and follow the instructions for SCPI from SCPI over Ethernet and the instructions for XCP in XCP over Ethernet.

As stated above, detailed and latest user manuals for both plugins are available on the DEWETRON CCC portal:

For detailed SPCI instructions and programming examples, refer to the manual OXYGEN Remote Control-SCPI Version Vx.x which is available on the DEWETRON CCC portal (https://ccc.dewetron.com/).

A user instruction to setup a remote control via CANape can be found in the document DEWETRON_OXYGEN_XCP_User_Instructions_Vx.x which is available on the DEWETRON CCC portal (https://ccc.dewetron.com/).

Remote control indicator

If remote control is enabled, the Lock Screen button will change to a Remote Control indicator and marks if OXYGEN is controlled by remote (see Fig. 125).

*Remote Control* indicator

Fig. 125 Remote Control indicator

Streaming interfaces

EtherCAT slave

Note

This is an optional feature and requires a license.

Using the EtherCAT slave subsystem, an OXYGEN system is able to provide timestamped periodic measurement values to an EtherCAT master. The most important control features as well as some status information are provided as well.

OXYGEN EtherCAT functionality currently only supports TRION-ETHERCAT boards.

For detailed instructions, refer to the manual OXYGEN EtherCAT Slave Vx.x. which is available on the DEWETRON CCC portal (https://ccc.dewetron.com/).

For additional information about typical performance and other basic points, refer to Table 6.

Data stream plugin

Note

This is an optional feature and requires a license.

The OXYGEN Data Stream plugin provides the following features:

  • High Speed data access

  • Efficient raw data transfer

  • Multi data stream support

  • Multi network port support

  • Configurable via SCPI

Data stream plugin – overview

Fig. 126 Data stream plugin – overview

For detailed instructions and programming examples, refer to the manual OXYGEN DataStream Plugin Vx.x which is available on the DEWETRON CCC portal (https://ccc.dewetron.com/).

For additional information about typical performance and other basic points, refer to Table 6.

Ethernet sender plugin

Note

This is an optional feature and requires a license.

Pop-up window to create an Ethernet sender

Fig. 127 Pop-up window to create an Ethernet sender

An Ethernet sender can be created and configured by pressing the Add button in the lower left corner of the Data Channels menu (marked red in Fig. 239).

For details about the Ethernet Sender plugin refer to the DEWETRON_OXYGEN_Ethernet_Sender_Vx.x Manual which is available on the DEWETRON CCC portal (https://ccc.dewetron.com/).

Remote control and data transfer interfaces

The following Table 6 provides an overview and comparison about the licensing, typical performance and other additional information of the different remote control and data transfer interfaces.

Table 6 Remote control and data transfer - overview

Interface option

Included in OXYGEN

Interface

Typ. application

Typ. performance

SCPI

Yes

Standard Ethernet

Fetching of actual values loading setup, application control, application

~50 S/s with 50 channels; up to 10 kS/s with 10 channels (buffered reading “ELOG”)

XCP Slave

License required

Standard Ethernet

Stream of measurement values, basic recording control; only compatible with CANape yet; INCA compatibility is in progress

~10 kS/s with 8 channels

EtherCAT

License required

TRION EtherCAT

EtherCAT testbed environment; Provide measurement values on the EtherCAT bus with PDO mechanism

~400 S/s with 100 channels

Data Stream

License required

Standard Ethernet

Live processing of raw and full speed data in 3rd party application; uses native TCP/IP sockets for data transfer; multiple streams can be created

~100 kS/s with 350 channels or ~2 MS/s with 12 channels

Ethernet Sender

Plugin required

Standard Ethernet

Send actual and synchronized data with timestamps

1-100 Hz

Typical I/O delay is 100-200 ms within all interface options

UI options

System settings *UI options* – overview

Fig. 128 System settings UI options – overview

In the UI Options, the user can change different settings of the UI appearance:

  • UI mode will change the size of the icons and adjust it for different PC types

  • Style will change the menu style

  • Color Scheme will change the color scheme of the software. A light and a dark mode are available.

  • Show touch keyboard regulates the appearance of a touch keyboard

  • Text size changes the text size in OXYGEN

  • Sidebar position: If Left side is selected, the sidebars will swap and the Reset button will set the menu order to the default order if changes have been made. For customizing the menu order, refer to Custom ordering of menu locations.

  • Channel setup: Edit highlighted row only: When this option is selected and the user selects a channel in the Channel Setup, the selected channel will only be highlighted when the user clicks on the channel name and a second click for changing the channel name is necessary. When this option is NOT selected, the user will be able to change the channel name by a single click on the channel name.

Localization

System settings *localization* – overview

Fig. 129 System settings localization – overview

In the Localization menu, the user can change the software language, set the software time to UTC time as well as change the time format and switch between the temperature units Celsius and Fahrenheit.

Security

System settings *Security* – overview

Fig. 130 System settings Security – overview

In the Security menu, the user can log certain measurement setup and recording options against unauthorized or unwanted changes and protect the measurement setup. These settings are stored to the measurement setup.

If this option is enabled, the settings are automatically locked after loading the setup.

The following functionalities can be locked:

  • Channel List: Protects all settings in the Channel List (see Data channels menu). If this option is enabled, the Channel List settings can only be viewed. To edit the settings, the setup must be unlocked by entering the correct password. The password must be entered in the Security tab of the System Settings.

  • Recording Stop: A password has to be entered to stop or pause a recording based on a measurement setup that has this option enabled. A popup will open to enter the password after pressing the stop or pause button.

  • Measurement Screen design: If this option is enabled, a password has to entered to access the Design Mode (see Adding an instrument to the measurement screen and channel assignment), to change the instrument’s channel assignment, axes scaling or their instrument properties. The password must be entered in the Security tab of the System Settings.

  • Save Setup: If this option is enabled, a password has to be entered to save changes on the measurement setup. A popup will open to enter the password after pressing the save setup button.

  • Recording Settings: If this option is enabled, a password has to be entered to edit the Data Storing and Multi-File settings (in System Settings Measurement Setup, see Measurement setup) and the settings in the Triggered Events menu (see Triggered Events). The password must be entered in the Security tab of the System Settings.

To activate the lock of certain setup settings, proceed the following steps:

Activation setup lock

Fig. 131 Activation setup lock

  • Select the settings that shall be locked (see ① in Fig. 131).

  • Press Set/modify password (see ② in Fig. 131).

  • Enter the password and confirm it (see ③ in Fig. 131).

  • The selected settings will be locked afterwards (see ④ in Fig. 131).

  • To unlock the settings again, press the Unlock button and enter the password (see ⑤ in Fig. 131).

  • To remove the lock from the setup again, press Remove lock in the unlocked state (see ⑥ in Fig. 131).

Shutdown

System settings *Shutdown* – overview

Fig. 132 System settings Shutdown – overview

In the Shutdown menu, the user can terminate OXYGEN and return to the operating system or shut down the whole system.